Riverside

Folklore #600(12”)    

RLP 12-601~620

RLP-601 Ed McCurdy: THE BALLAD REOCRD 

 

Ed McCurdy (vcl, g) 

March 21 & 29, 1955 

 

BRITISH BALLADS 

Sir. Patrick Spens (Child #58)

The Three Ravens (Child #26) 

The Twa Corbies (Child #26) 

Get Up an dBar the Door (Child #275) 

Son Davie, Son Davie (Child #13) 

The Unique Grave (Child #13) 

The Uniquet Grave (Child #78) 

The Bitter Withy 

BRITISH BALLADS IN AMERICA 

Crow Song (Child #26) 

Black Jack Davie (Child #200) 

Old Bangum (Child #18) 

High Barbary 

BROADSIDE BALLADS 

Brennan on the Moor 

William Glen 

The Butcher Boy 

The Poor an dSingle Sailor 

AMERICAN BALLADS 

Springfield Mountain 

John Henry 

Canada I. O. 

Naomi Wise 

 

NOTE: RLP12-601 edited and notes written by Kenneth S. Goldstein and MaEdward Leach.; recorded by Jac Holzman. 

Cover by Paul Bacon. RLP12-601 reissued as Washington WLP-705 “The Ballad Record” 

RLP-601 WLP-705 

           

RIVERSIDE RECORDS are released by BILL GRAUER PRODUCITONS 

553 West 51st Street New York 19, N.Y.

RLP-601 front.jpg
RLP-601 back.jpg
RLP-601 A.jpg
RLP-601 B.jpg

RLP 12-602 MARGARET BARRY: IRISH TINKER LADY 

STREET SONGS AND ABLLADS SUNG BY MARGARET BARRY 

 

Margaret Barry (vcl, bj) acc by Jimmy Cleary (bj) 

NYC(?); March 10, 1955 

 

She Moves Therough the Fair 

The Cycling Champion of Ulster 

The Factory Girl 

The Hills of Donegal 

The Turfman from Ardee 

Moses Ritoorel-i-ay 

My Lagan Love 

The Galway Shawl 

The Bold Fenian Men 

The Flower of Sweet Strabane 

The Cottage with the Horseshoe O’er the Door 

Belfast Hornpipe (bj duet) 

 

NOTE: RLP12-602 edited by Kenneth S/. Goldstein and notes written by Kenneth Goldstein and Ewan MacColl.

Recorded by Ewan MacColl and cover by Darth. 

RLP12-602 reissued as Washington WLP-731 “Songs from the Hills of Donegal” cover designed by Ken Deardoff. 

RLP12-602 WLP-731 

           

RIVERSIDE RECORDS are released by BILL GRAUER PRODUCITONS 

553 West 51st Street New York 19, N.Y.

RLP-602 front.jpg
RLP-602 back.jpg
RLP-602 A.jpg
RLP-602 B.jpg

RLP 12-603 MERRY DITTIES Sung by MILT OKUN 

 

Milt Okun (vcl) New York; September 1955

RLP-603 front.jpg
RLP-603 back.jpg
RLP-603 A.jpg
RLP-603 B.jpg

SIDE 1

  1. A-Roving 

  2. Lavendar’s Blue 

  3. The Bold Grenadier 

  4. Unfortunate Miss Bailey 

  5. The Trooper and the Tailor 

  6. Jackie Rover 

  7. The Little Scotch Girl 

SIDE 2

  1. Early One Morning 

  2. Puttin’ on the Style 

  3. Captain Walker’s Courtship 

  4. Katey Morey 

  5. Billy Boy 

  6. I Wish I Was Single Again 

  7. Won’t You Sit with Me Awhile? 

   Milt Okun has chosen these songs from my book “Merry Ditties,” an unexpurgated collection of delectable songs from popular tradition.  Some of these, marked with an asterisk (*) below, come from my work in a field study of music of the Catskill Mountain region.  Others are compilations from songbook and broadsides form the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries, and from many sources in oral tradition.  

   Most merry ditties deal with the intimacies of men and women, with the trials and joys of love. Courting and disporting are described in delicate and imaginative fashion, with deft humor and deep sumathy.  Naturally, affairs of sex and sex play are prominent.  Traditional songs treat these affairs frankly, fairly and with a notable maturity made memorable through delightful and haunting tunes.  The late George Edwars once remarked about Captain Walker’s Courtship, “There’s no harm in it, there’s no harm in it to anyone,”  And we believe with him that the suggestive and uninhibited and often lusty passages in many of these songs should offend no one.  

   The lofty character of traditional merry ditties reflects their origin as songs of the people.  Unlike the products of the commercial entertainment industry, which 

 

NOTE: RLP603 edited by Kenneth S. Goldstein and notes written by Norman Cazden. 

recorded by Jac Holzkaj and cover by “Darth.”

             

RIVERSIDE RECORDS are released by BILL GRAUER PRODUCTIONS

553 West 51st Street New York 19, N.Y. 

 

RLP 12-604 IRISH DRINKING SONGS Sung by PATRICK GALVIN 

Accompanied by AL JEFFREY

SIDE 1

  1.A Sup of Good Whiskey * 

  2.Mush Mush 3.

  3.Lanigan’s Ball * 

  4.A Toast to Ireland 

  5.The Rakes of Mallow * 

  6.The Cruiskeen Lawn 

  7.Garryowen * 

  8.Mick McGilligan’sDaughter

 

 (*) Indicates banjo accompaniment; others accompanied by guitar. 

SIDE 2

    9. Finnegan’s Wake

  10. The Real Old Mountain Dew *

  11. One-Eyed Reilly

  12. Barryof Macroom *

  13. The Moonshiner 

  14. Flowing Bumpers 

  15. Master MacGrath * 

  16. The Parting Glass

RLP-604 front.jpg
RLP-604 BACK.jpg
RLP-604 A.jpg
RLP-604 B.jpg

   IRISH DRINKING SONGS is a somewhat artificial classification for the songs included in this album, in that it could be taken to mean that only songs of this sort would be sung at “drinking parties.”  Irish are given to such “drinking parties,” and secondly, that there is a certain narrowness in the choice of songs at get-togethers.  I fact the characteristic Irish get-together is what we call a hooley, which is a social evening including dancing as well as singing, and food as well as drinking, and at which the songs always include a good many of the national (or “rebel”) songs and ballads, a toast to Irish revels being an invariable part of the evening.  Thus the songs given here could e considered characteristic only if liberally interspersed with songs of the revel type.  This is not to say that the Irish hooley is a solemn or sanctimonious affair; not only are the songs of the type given here mainly rollicking and rumbustious, but many of the revel songs are spirited and cheerful, as well. 

   These songs have been selected so as to give an impression of varying types of songs whose merit is their entertainment value.  The audiences normally know the words well and always join is the chorus or even in the whole song.  

As will be seen from the notes, some of the songs are no longer widely current in Ireland, but are included for historical and exile interest. 

   Some of the songs are, of course, clearly Anglo-Irish, in the sense that they are the product of outsiders, or part-outsiders, endeavoring to express an Irish atmosphere, and with great sympathy and affection.  It may be doubted whether such characters as Tim Finnegan and Jeremy Lannigan ever existed or could exist in reality any more than did Handy Andy (a good-natured, blundering Irish lad in Samuel Lover’s novely by that name), but they represent on the one hand an Irish striving, and on the other an Anglo-Irish sympathy, for the right to enjoy oneself in one’s own way.  This was inadequate to the greater national strivings of Ireland, and the heyday of Anglo-Irishism is long past, but it has its historical place. 

   It is hoped that listeners will themselves join in the songs and get the most out of this record by imagining themselves for a while at a hooley in an Irish country kitchen, or at a gathering of Irish exiles settling down to a good old Irish evening.  So, clear the floor, boys, shake yer trotters and mind the dresser!  The whiskey is coming up! 

 

  1. A SUP OF GOOD WHISKEY: The air to which this delightful tongue-tripper is sung is that of the popular jug tune.  The Irish Washerwoman. Clearly a composed song, but of unknown authorship, it dates from the mid-nineteenth century. The song is self-explanatory and extols the virtues of the subject of its title. 

  2. MUSH MUSH: This nineteenth century song to a traditional air is one of the most popular of all hooey songs both in and out of Ireland.  It is a quaint mixture of Irish codology and Handy Andyism, with a dash of hedge-schoolmaster classicism, rounded off with the rather English tooralooral jingle. 

  3. LANIGAN’S BALL: Like Finnegan’s Wake (see No. 9), this is a classic of the Dublin free-and-easies.  Its popularity in Ireland disappeared with this century and the national revival, but it is still heard in hooley outside Ireland.  A TOAST TO IRELAND: Here is a typical example of the get-together song based on the come-all-ye style.  A twentieth century anonymous ballad in the continuing tradition of the exile songs, it is of generalized rather than of narrative patterp.  It is often heard sung by Irish workers at parties and hooleys outside Ireland. 

  4. THE RAKES OF MALLOW: One of the most famous of all Irish airs, the tune of this song is far better known than the words to it.  Though sometimes attributed to the seventeenth century, its whole style and tone is that of the early eighteenth century.  It might indeed stand as a monument to the mad-cap Anglo-Irish devil-may-care lordings of the day, when Mallow was the Irish equivalent of Bath in England at a later date.  Though the words are undeservedly neglected and scarecely known except to the literati, the air is invariably beard at every hooley in Ireland and elsewhere.  Printed versions do not usually include the chorus. 

  5. THE CRUISKEEN LAWN: Perhaps the most famous of all Irish drinking songs, The Cruiskeen Lawn (the full little flask) is well known and popular with all Irish classes and is also a showpiece in favor with platform singers.  Its literary tone does not prevent it, however, from being a prime favorite in the public houses, no doubt owing to its enchanting air.  It is usually attributed to the late seventeenth or early eighteen century. 

  6.  GARRYOWEN: This song commemorates a devil-may-care defiance of a less aristocratic and more rowdy kind than that of The Rakes of Maroow, who were indisputably gentlemen.  Garryowen (Owen’s Garden) is a suburb of Limerick, which after the surrender and broken Treaty of 1691 became a major garrison town of the British authorities.  Throughout the eighteenth century, up to about 1780, it was notorious for every kind of rag, riot and general melee, not of political kinds but of the type common among soldiery and popoulace in conditions of occupation, when no serieus organized resistance has yet developed.  Often it consisted of brass bands made up of frying pans and fire-irons, of hunting the fox through private houses at dead of night, or of gangs running around naked pretending to be ghosts, and other like amusements.  Johnny Connell and Darby O’Brien, mentioned in the last two stanzas, were famous squireens whose exploits were notorious around 1770-1780. 

  7. MICK McGILLIGAN’S DAUGHTER: Here is an example of a parody driving out the original on which it is based.  The original, a rustic love song of the same title, is now half-forgotten.  There are dozens of versions of the parody, in which Mary Anne becomes a legendary figure of heroic proportions.  The version given here affords only a glimpse of Mary Anne’s potentialities.  Various versions of the song are extremely popular at Irish hooleys. 

  8. FINNEGAN’S WAKE: This popular air is an Irish jig-tune, clearly intended for dancing, as the chorus shows.  The song itself is of mid-Victorian music hall origin, belonging to the Dublin free-and-easies.  This type of song was objected to – as being overmuch in the Handy Andy tradition – by the Gaelic League movement in its work to heighten national pride, and these songs have now long become more literary curiosities than popular ballads. This and Lanigan’s Ball are included here as the classic examples of this outmoded, rollicking style.  Finnegan’s Wake is also, of course, of interest for having provided James Joyce with the title of his famous book.  Joyce took the not-so-dead Finnegan as symbolic of Ireland herself, which gives the song a literary and historical interest which has nothing to do with its actual words.  The use of such a song with this symbolic purpose was clearly satirical on Joyce’s part. 

  9. THE REAL OLD MOUNTAIN DEW: This song may be sung to this melody or to the air of Are You There, Moriarity.  Other versions of the song make mention of “guagers” (excise men) instead of “peelers,” making this song of early nineteenth century origin; “peelers” is the mid-nineteenth century term for policemen, named after Sir Robert Peel.  The “mountain dew” or poteen (pronounced potcheen) is spirits illicitly distilled from potatoes, or from wheat or rye if available.  This song-should not be confused with Good Old Mountain Dew, a song with like sentiments written by the North Carolina collector and folk singer, Bascom Lamar Lunsford. 

  10. ONE-EYED REILLY: This song should need no introduction whatever to anyone who has ever been in the armed forces, being the modern barrack-room ballad par excellence.  It is, of course, by no means confined to the Irish, who have claim to it solely through the name Reilly. This is naturally a moderated version.  It is almost impossible to be at any sort of drinking party without hearing some version of this masculine classic, and the wilder the party, the earthier the words. 

  11.  BARRY OF MACROOM: this early nineteenth century song of an unusual drinking feat is sung to the air of The Bantry Girl’s Lament; its words are attributed to Richard Ryan.  Though Barry of Macroom and Jem Nash appear to be purely legendary, several Irish drinkers of note have left their mark.  Dan MacCarty, for example, was famous for drinking large quantities of rum and brandy, calling them (as distinct from punch) “naked truth.”  MacCarty (mentioned in the first line of this song) died in 1751 at the age of 112.  Another character is on record as having declared under oath that he had been for eighteen years in the habit of drinking at least twenty-four tumblers of whiskey punch every night.  “I never keep count beyond the two dozen,” said he.  In writing of this song, T. C. Croker in his Popular Song of Ireland remarks “it is hoped that Mr. Barry’s example may have had its influence in diffusing a civilized taste for whiskey-punch … and thus, by inducing the drinkers of ‘naked truth’ to dilute their liquor, effect a moral improvement.” 

  12. THE MOONSHINER: Both the tune and words of this song are widely known, the words appearing throughout the English-speaking world in numberless variants.  The American Rye Whiskey, for example, is well known in Britain and Ireland.  The use of the term Moonshine for illicit liquor makes it not earlier than the 18th century; this particular version is a twentieth century one, popularized by Delia Murphy. 

  13. FLOWING BUMPERS: Sung to the tune of Lillibullero, this hymn to illicitly distilled whiskey appeared in Blackwood’s Magazine, December, 1821, allegedly having been composed on the spur of the moment at four o’clock one morning.  It is a spirited example of the conventional “we won’t go home till morning” mood, and is plainly meant for singing in chorus by men who are mellow rather than roaring drunk. 

  14.  MASTER McGRATH: This tune is probably the commonest of all ballad airs in the world, being that of The Old Orange Flute, Nottingham Fair, Villikens and his Dinah, Sweet Betsy from Pike, etc.  This is a characteristic street ballad of an actual event, commemorating the winning of the Waterloo Cup by the Irish greyhound, Master McGrath, one of the few dogs in the world to have a public monument erected in his honor.  The dog was bred in Dungarvin, the ancient seat of the McGrath clans, trained by the sorting peer, Lord Lurgan, and won the Waterloo cup three times – 1868, 1869, 1871. There are a number of variants of the song, which grows by accretion.  Though not in itself a “drinking song,” no hooley is complete without it. 

  15.  THE PARTING GLASS: The melody of this song is that of Sweet Coothill Town, a Munster song (see Joyce’s Irish peasant Songs, 1906), and Robert Burns’ Adieu, A Heart-Warm Adieu (known as Burns’ Farewell). The words are late eighteenth or early nineteenth century, and have a definitely Burnsian flavor. The song is particularly popular in the south-western counties of Ireland.  Variousother words have been put to this remarkably beautiful air at different times. 

Notes by PATRICK GALVIN

 

A Biographical Note: - 

   Born in Cork City, Ireland, in 1927, PATRICK GALVIN includes among his many talents those of story-writer, poet, critic, folksinger, song collector, and author.  His work has appeared in many of the leading British and Irish magazines and has been broadcast on Radio Eireann.  He has broadcast his own work on the British Broadcast in Corporation’s “Third Programme,” and has sung on the B.B.C folk song series.  “As I Roved Out.”  He is the author of “Irish Songs of Resistance.” Published in this country by The Folklore Press, 509 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

 

 

NOTE: RLP12-604 edited by Kenneth S. Goldstein and notes written by Patrick Galvin. Instrumental arrangements by 

William Sahnow. Cover by Paul Bacon. 

 

RIVERSIDE RECORDS are released by BILL GRAUER PRODUCTIONS

553 West 51st Street New York 19, New York

RLP 12-605 SCOTS DRINKING SONGS sung by EWAN MacCOLL 

 

SIDE 1

   1. We’re A’ Jolly Fu’

   2. The Calton Weaver

   3. When She Came Ben She Bobbit

   4. The Laird of the Dainty Doon Bye

   5. Blow the Candle Out 

   6. Donald Blue

   7. The Breweer Laddie

   8. We’re Gayly Yet

   9. A Wee Drappie O’t

 10. The Cuckoo’s Nest

SIDE 2  

   1.   Green Grow the Rashes, O 

   2.   The Day We Went to Rothesay, O

   3.   The Bonnie Wee Lassie Who Never Said No

   4.   The Muckin’ o’ Geordier’s Bye

   5.   Jock Hawk’s Adventures in Glascow

   6.   The Blisk Young Lad

   7.   I Wish That You Were Dead, Guidman

   8.   The Wind Blew the Bonnie Lassie’s Plaidie Awa’

   9.   Andro and His Cutty Gun

RLP-605FRONT.jpg
RLP-605BACK.jpg
RLP-605 A.jpg
RLP-605 B.jpg

   It has been observed that the pattern of social drinking in Scotland corresponds roughly to the three movements which comprise a pibroch’.  First, there is the leisurely philosophical discussion, argument or monologue during which the theme of the evening is stated.  The second movement consists of a set of variations in the form of repeated patriotic utterances and the last movement is a scherzo in which amorousness and bawdiness are combined to show the national prowess in a sport which, as far as we are concerned, has all the competitive features of international football. 

   The first movement is non-melodic; being confined to pure talk.  The second movement is a synthesis of talk and patriotic song and the third and longest movement is wholly song. 

Scots licensing laws have done their best to destroy this ancient pattern by making singing in pubs an offence and, wherever possible, by segregating the sexes.  The legislators appear to have operated on the basis of the good old Calvinistic maxims that women are the root of all evil and tat singing and licentiousness are interchangeable words.  However, what is lost in the pubs is gained in the family circle and many a child who might otherwise have grown to ignorant maturity has learned some of the more interesting and pleasurable facts of life from listening to songs sung by Auntie Mag and Uncle Alec at a Hogmanay (New Year) party. 

   As in Italy, love is the great theme of Scots folk song but, unlike Italy, it is the act of love rather than the emotion of the flesh and numerous Holy Willies might rat against evildoers but the commons of Scotland had a healthy, realistic attitude on love which no amount of Calvinistic preaching could pervert.  True, there were the prying elders and the cutty stool to be faced after the act but the joys of love and the body’s needs outweighed all such considerations. 

   The frank expression of physical desire in Scots folksong has been a subject for dismay with collectors and anthologists for more than two hundred years.  Only David Herd’s collections (“The Ancient and Modern Scots Songs, 1769) escaped the embalmer’s knife of polite hypocrisy.  Bishop Thomas Percy, famed for the “Reliques of Ancient English Poetry,” offered to clean up Herd’s collection but Herd, being an honest man, refused and published the songs as he had found them. 

   Since that time, the majority of Scots collectors, apparently unware of the fact that babies are not found under cabbage leaves, have divided their time between attempting to castrate the muse and apologizing for Herd and the lower classes’ capacity for lovemaking. 

The fig leaf of Calvinism cannot disguise the virility and appetite of the Scots muse and under the influence of a few drink the fig leaf disappears through the window and the muse, with a smacking of lips and a bellow of laughter, proceeds to celebrate the most universal of man’s pastimes. 

 

Side 1 – 

1. WE’RE A’ JOLLY FU’: This centuries-old song lends itself to interminable improvisations and is a great favorite at all-male drinking sessions where the    fantasy tends to become exclusively sexual after a while. 

2. HE CALTON WEAVER: The linen mills of the Calton district of Glasgow have been gone these fifty years but this song is still well known among those    who take their drinking seriously.  Afl Edwards accompanies me on the concertia. 

3. WEN SHE CAME BEN SHE BOBBIT: I learned this from Williams Miller of Stirling.  The Laird of Cockpen, though largely a mythical figure is the    questionable hero of scores of Scots songs and ballads.  A brushed up version of When She Came Ben She Bobbit was made by Robert Burns but the    folk song anthologists have, without exception, avoided the older and broader versions and made use of Lady Nairn’s admirable little song The Laird    of Cockpen in which the original ribaldry is replaced by a rather pawky humor. 

4. THE LAIRD OF THE DAINTY DOON BYE: It is strange that Professor Child did not include a version of this traditional ballad in his collections for it    was already of considerable age when it first appeared in print in Herd’s collection in 1776.  It is still a prime favorite with good company.  I learned it    from Jeannie Robertson, housewife and ballad singer of Dundee. 

5. BLOW THE CANDLE OUT: Though originally an English song, Blow the Candel Out is now widely sung throughout lowland Scotland and has been    popular in various versions in the bothies for the best part of three quarters of a century.  In this and all other numbers employing the guitar I am    accompanied by Brian Daly. 

6. DONALD BLUE: The drunken wife is a popular subject in Scots folk song and, indeed, Scots classical literature too. It was from songs such as this one and    The Drunken Wife of Galloway that the 16th and 17th century poets like Williams Dunbar and Sir David Lyndsay of the Mount took their fabulous    heroines. 

7. THE BREWER LADDIE: A ‘cornkister’, The Brewer Laddie has been popular in the North East for at least the last hundred years.  The forsaken and jilted    heroes and heroines of the bothly ballads do not die for love; instead they meet their misfortunes head o and, with a good deal of sound sense, start l 

   ooking around for another sweetheart. 

8. WE’RE GAYLY YET: This is sung at the height of the party, when the drink is flowing freely and all the barriers are down.  I learned this from Samuel    Wylie of Falkirk. 

9. A WEE DRAPPIE O’T: this is the work of Robert Tannahill (1774-1810), the cotton weaver bard of Paisley.  Like many other Scots workers of his time, he    was inspired by the example of Robert Burns to write poems and songs in the language of his workmates.  At least three of his songs have become part    of the Scots tradition.  A Wee Drappie O’t belongs to that part of a drinking session which is characterized by the first glow of good fellowship and a    good deal of philosophizing. 

10. THE CUCKOO’S NEST:  The veneer of Calvinism is wafer-thin as far as the Scots working class is concerned.  A few drinks are all that is need to set the    company singing songs like this one.  I learned it from Jeanie Robertson. 

Side 2 – 

1. GREEN GROW THE RASHES, O:  In spite of Burns’ remaking of this old song, the old version continues to be sung fairly widely.  Both the original and    Burns’ song would be likely to turn up at most any drinking session. 

2. THE DAY WE WENT TO ROTHESAY, O:  In rural Scotland they still sing The Tinker’s Weddin’ O, but in the towns the tune has become fixed as part of    Urban folklore and the saga of a rough weekend in Scotland’s most popular resort will bring down the house at any south Scots ceilidh. 

3. THE BONNIE LASSIE WHO NEVER SAID NO:  This is a real song of low life, one of the great corpus of such songs which inspired Burns’ folk cantata,    The Jolly Beggars. The scene is a drinking howff (part pub, part brothel).  A man and a harlot make a night of it and when the woman passes out the    man robs her.  The choice of gin as the liquor suggests that the song is the product of the early eighteen hundreds when every town in Britain had its ‘

   Gin Alley’.  It is unusual for any other drink than whiskey to be celebrated in a Scots song. 

4. THE MUCKIN’ O’ GEORDIE’S BYRE:  This is probably the most well known song in Eastern Scotland and no ‘boose-up’ is complete without at least one    rendering.  I know it from the singing of Jimmie MacBeth of Elgin. 

5. JACK HAWK’S ADVENTURES IN GLASGOW:  This is a bothy song set to a tune dear to all bothy singers, The Guise O’ Tough.  The basic bothy theme    of the ploughman being taken-in by the rich farmer is altered slightly and becomes the ploughman taken-in by smart city folk.  The general bothy    

   pattern is, however, the same; as always, the ploughman implies that nobody is to blame but himself. 

6. THE BRISK YOUNGLAD:  Here is a song of rich, native humor.  The boisterous chorus makes it a natural for a boosy gathering.  I originally learned it    

   from my mother and later collated the text with the one found in Herd’s collection. 

7. I WISH THAT YOU WERE DEAD, GUIDMAN:  Here is another song that first appeared in print in Herd’s collection.  It is still popular at masculine    drinking sessions at which a number of verses are sung which never get into print. 

8. THE WIND BLEW THE BONIE LASSIE’S PLAIDIE AWA’:  a great favorite in the bothies, this ballad has appeared in a number of printed collections    usually somewhat cleaned up for popular consumption.  It is a typical example of the Scots’ genius for calling a spade a spade, Presby-terianism

   notwithstanding. 

9. ANDROW AND HIS CUTTY GUN:  Burns said of this song “Andro and His Cutty Gun is one of the bonniest and certainly one of the most vigorous of    our  old songs.”  As a record of a drinking party it is certainly unequalled in Scots national music. Notes by EWAN MacCOLL

 

ABUOT THE SINGER

   EWAN MacCOLL is the Scots-born son of a Gaelic-speaking mother and Lowland father from whom he inherited more than a hundred songs.  He has worked as a garage hand, builder’s laborer, organizer, journalist, radio scrip-writer, actor and dramatist.  Since the war, MacColl has written and broadcast extensively about folk music.  He was general editor of the British Broadcasting Corporation folk music series, “Ballads and Blues,” and frequently took part in Alan Lomax’s radio and television shows for B.B.C.  His folksong publications include “Personal Choice,” a pocket edition of Scottish folksongs and ballads, and “The Shuttle and the Cage,” the first published collection of British industrial folk songs. 

   Of the songs he has included in this album, MacColl writes: “I can remember as a child being allowed to say up at Hogmanay parties when a dozen Scots iron-moulders and their wives would settle down to serious drinking. A Wee Drappie O’t would be sung with everyone joining in the chorus with maybe a few English friends looking a bit embarrassed at this display of Celtic emotion and the beer jugs would e circulating freely and whiskey bottles would empty at an alarming rate. In between the songs the company would argue the merits of Edward Cold’s “History of Creation and Volny’s ‘Ruuins of Empires’ and then as the singing became more and more rough I would be sent off to bed.  As these junketing often lasted for a whole week I had plenty of opportunities to learn the songs.” K.S.G.

 

NOTE: all 19 titles also on Offbeat OLP-4023

RLP12-605 edited by Kenneth S. Goldstein and notes written by Ewan MacColl. Cover deign by Paul Bacon. 

Offbeat OLP-4023 “Scotch Drinking Songs”

S-2 “Riverside Folk Song Sampler”

RLP12-605 OLP-4023 S-2 

           

RIVERSIDE RECORDS are produced by BILL GRAUER PRODUCTIONS, Inc. 

235 West 46th Street New York 36, New York

RLP 12-606 AUSTRALIAN BUSH SONGS Sung by A. L. LLOYD 

 

SIDE 1

 1. The Lime-Juice Tub

 2. The Maryborough Miner

 3. The Drover’s Dream

 4. The Banks of the Condamine 

 5. Bluey Brink 

 6. Click Go the Shears

 7. The Wild Colonial Boy

SIDE 2

 1. Euabalong Ball 

 2. The Cockies of Bungaree 

 3. Brisbane Ladies 

 4. The road to Gundagai 

 5. The Castlereagh River 

 6. The Lachlan Tigers 

 7. Bold Jack Donahue 

RLP-606 FRONT.jpg
RLP-606 BACK.jpg
RLP-606 A.jpg
RLP-606 B.jpg

   These are songs which have been sung in the men’s quarters of the big sheep stations, or along the clattering board of the shearing sheds, or in the kitchens of little wooden farmhouses when company has called from along the creek, or round the campfires of cattle drovers or the “swaggies” who walk the continent with a roll of blankets and a quart pot. 

   The songs have in them the great Australian characteristics of toughness, nonchalance and independence. In describing each of these attributes, the following anecdotes are related: 

   Toughness: It is reported that there were convicts (Australia’s founding fathers) who, bleeding from the lash, would spit in the flogger’s face and tell him he “couldn’t whip hard enough to kill a butterfly.” 

   Nonchalance: A sheep-hand, wakened from his siesta by a shout of “Hey, there’s a snake by our foot!” asked lazily: “Which foot?” 

   Independence: A sheep-owner offered a “swaggie” a lift in his car, and the answer was: “Nao.  Open your own flamin’ (damned) gates.” 

   And American commentator has remarked on the Australian’s “aggressive insistence on the worth and unique importance of the common man.”  It is all in his songs. 

  1. THE LIME-JUICE TUB:  In the early 9130s when I was working on the Lachlan River, N.S.W., this song was much sung in the woolsheds while the men were actually shearing.  I don’t remember any other song being used to the same extent. Australian songs generally come pretty slow, whereas shearers, being on piece-work, like to move pretty fast.  Perhaps Lime-Juice Tubowed its popularity as a working-song rather to the briskness of its tempo than to its words or the beauty of its tune. Mostly the song hits at immigrants who may give themselves airs, but are not skilled enough to hold down a job in a shearing-shed, and so are obliged to tramp the bush-tracks with their roll of blankets, called a “drum”.  The song has countless verses, not all suitable for family listening. 

  2. THE MARYBOROUGH MINER:  The great Australian gold rushes which began in the 1850s developed a sturdy self-reliant class of men.  Among the most admirable were the men who raised the flag of stars at Eureka Stockade in 1954 in rebellion against oppressive authority.  Among the least admirable were those who were prepared to get their gold at the point of the pistol, if they couldn’t get it by the point of the pick.  But often it was hard to tell the best from the worst among the diggers, as with the genial old rascal of this song. Of the township of Maryborough, Victoria, Mark Twain said it was “a railway station with a town attached.”  The people of Maryborough replied: “Even Mark Twain has to pay tribute to our impressive railway station.” 

  3. THE DROVER’S DREAM:  The original words of this favorite bit of bush whimsy were probably made by a man of education, rather than a son of the common people; if so, his culture had not soured his nature and accordingly the folk took his little fantasy to their hearts.  Nowadays, the song exists in many versions, of which the present one is among the more innocent.  The tune may be recognized as a variant of the American Civil War marching song, Tramp, Tramp, Tramp. 

  4. THE BANKS OF THE CONDAMINE:  In Australian folk song, though most of the melodies derive from British (especially Irish ‘come-all-ye’) models, the texts are as a rule of native Australian stock.  This song is something of an exception, in that its poetry bears the stamp of British country song.  It is in fact a remake of a widespread English ballad which began life in the 17th century as The Undaunted Seaman, and which turns up on various broadsides as Young Henry of the Raging Main, The Shores of Lisbon, and The Banks of the Nile.  In Australia, the ballad exists in various versions, naming different localities and concerned with different bush trades. In most settings, Willie is a shearer.  Indeed, this horse-breaker version is something of rarity.  The air is a variant of the widespread melody known in Ireland as Mary Griffin, and in Scotland as The Lass of the Whinnie Knowes. 

  5. BLUEY BRINK:  The notion is widespread among Australian city-dwellers that the inhabitants of the bush are all hard drinkers and fierce liars; and bush folk like to encourage this idea, just for fun.  So songs of the type of Bluey Brink may be taken as characteristic though not very common.  The tune is a variant of Villikins, which has probably carried more texts through the English speaking world than any other melody ever did. 

  6. CLICK GO THE SHEARS:  This is a favorite song of the shearing sheds, particularly along the Lachlan River.  The figure of the dogged old shearer who sets his teeth and determines to show he can still do it, is familiar in Australia folklore; sympathy or admiration for the old-time is a constant theme.  The tune is that of a much parodied revival hymn, Pull For The Shore, also known to temperance enthusiasts as Sign the Pledge, Brothers.  

  7. THE WOLD COLONIAL BOY:  this, the best known of all Australian songs, presents some mystery.  The records show no trace of the actual bushrange whose exploits are described in the ballad.  There was a district judge in Victoria named McEvoy (or Macoboy), and the Beechworth mail-coach was held up in 1869, but by an undistinguished bushranger named Henry Power (the judge was not a passenger that day).  The general opinion is that this is yet another ballad made on the basis of Bold Jack Donahue (see number 14), probably in the 1860s. Whatever his symbol of great force and meaning to poor farmers and bush workers in the latter part of the 19th century. 

  8. EUABALONG BALL:  Euabalong is in the Lachlan (NSW) country, not far from the township of Forbes, where the well-known bushrange Ben Hall was shot.  The song is characteristic of that small part of Australian tradition which has an affinity to the songs of the American West. 

  9. THE COCKIES OF BUNGAREE:  Songs of this kind probably entered Australian tradition from the repertoire of Scottish farmhands who have countless songs satirizing conditions among the hungry farmers.  But though to some extent it is paralleled by certain Scots bothy ballads, and by American productions such as The State of Arkansas, the text of the The Cockies of Bungaree is a purely Australian affair.  “Cockies” are small famers – cockatoo farmers, because their poor holdings can raise nothing but cockatoos. 

  10. BRISBANE LADIES:  There is a favorite sea song called Spanish Ladies which was popular as far back as the end of the 18th century.  The song lived on vigorously in its original form and also in many parodies, all over the English speaking world from Nova Scotia to New South Wales.  This version was sung by Queensland drovers, using the old tune and a hint of the old words, but otherwise as Australian as a stringbark sliprail.  Brisbane Ladies was a campfire song … and a good one. 

  11. 1 THE ROAD TO GUNDAGAI:  This is perhaps the best loved of all the shearers’ songs.  Gundagai is a township of no great distinction in south-eastern New South Wales.  For some reason it has become an important place in Australian folklore, and it crops up in many well-known songs.  This may be because of its position on the main road from the great woolsheds of the Riverina to Sydney, the paradise which every young New South Wales shearer had in his eye as soon as the shearing season was over.  Not that he always got so far, as this song explains.  

  12. THE CASTLEREAGH RIVER:  The Australian bush poet A.B. (banjo) Paterson included this text among his published works, though it is not clear whether he actually wrote it or merely remade it as Burns did certain Scots folk lyrics.  Sometimes called The Old Jig Jog, it is well known among sheep and cattle hands. The Castlereagh is one of the tributaries of the Barwon River in NSW. 

  13.  THE LACHLAN TIGERS:  In the heyday of the wool business, some Australian stations would shear 100,000 sheep every year in long sheds with maybe fifty men in line all going “like tigers”, trying to follow the pace set by the “ringer”, the fastest shearer.  A ma’s worth was measured by the number of sheep he could shear without having to call to often on the tar-boy to dress the sheeps’ wounds with a dab of Stockholm tar.  Jacky Howe, the champion blade-shearer, shore 321 sheep in a day’s work, back in 1892.  His record stood until 1947, when Daniel Cooper shore 325 at Glanara, Victoria.  The melody used here for Lachlan Tigers is borrowed from the Australian song, The Shearers’ Cook. 

  14. BOLD JACK DONAHUE: This is one of the oldest, and perhaps the greatest of the Australian bushranger ballads.  Jack Donahue was shot at Bringelly, near Argyle, NSW, in September 1830, and the song must have been made shortly after perhaps by an Irish convict.  So firm was Donahue’s grip on the popular imagination, and so powerful was the effect of his song, that several ballads concerning the bushrangers of later generations are merely remakes of songs that originally celebrated Jack Donahue.  Bold Jack Donahue is probably the most widely travelled of Australian ballads, very complete versions having been collected from singers as far from New South Wales as Austin, Texas, and River John, Nova Scotia.  The older generation of Australian station hands, shearers and drovers still have a great veneration for Bold Jack Donahue.   Notes by A. L. Lloyd

 

A NOTE ABOUT THE SINGER: 

A leading English folklorist, A. L. LLOYD, first took a conscious interest in folksongs as a young sheep-herder and shearing-shed worker in New South Wales, Australian.  The job left its mark him, for shearing with a hot hand piece has erased right thumb-print. The first folksongs he ever became aware of were sung by station hands, shearers, aged rabbiters, and lonely eccentrics tramping the continent to find gold, or to get away from company, or to regain a past that never existed.  Whenever he heard a song he liked he copied the words into an exercise book, not as a musicologist or folklorist, but merely to learn the songs.  Many of these are included in this album. 

He extended his first-hand acquaintance with songs and their singers while working at sea during the 1930s, particularly in Antarctic whaling ships.  He has written and broadcast a great deal about folk songs, besides performing them in the concert hall, on radio and television.  Recently, John Huston sought him out to play the part of Shantyman in the film version of Moby Dick. K.S.G.

 

NOTE: RLP12-606 edited by Kenneth S. Goldstein and notes written by A. L. Lloyd 

Cover design by Paul Bacon and illustration by Boornazian. 

S-2 “Riverside Folk Song Sampler”

Edited by Kenneth S. Goldstein; recording Engineer: no information

RIVERSIDE RECORDS are produced by BILL GRAUER PRODUCTIONS, Inc. 

235 West 46th Street New York 36, New York

RLP12--607  RISH DRINKING SONGS Sung by PATRICK GALVIN 

Accompanied by AL JEFFREY

 

SIDE 1

 1. A Sup of Good Whiskey * 

 2. Mush Mush 

 3. Lanigan’s Ball * 

 4. A Toast to Ireland 

 5. The Rakes of Mallow *

 6. The Cruiskeen Lawn 

 7. Garryowen * 1

 8. Mick McGilligan’sDaughter 

(*) Indicates banjo accompaniment; others accompanied by guitar.

SIDE 2

   9. A Sup of Good Whiskey * 9.   Finnegan’s Wake

 10. Mush Mush 10. The Real Old Mountain Dew *

 11. Lanigan’s Ball * 11. One-Eyed Reilly

 12. A Toast to Ireland 12. Barryof Macroom *

 13. The Rakes of Mallow * 13. The Moonshiner 

 14. The Cruiskeen Lawn 14. Flowing Bumpers 

 15. Garryowen * 15. Master MacGrath * 

 16. Mick McGilligan’sDaughter 16. The Parting Glass

RLP-607 front .jpg
RLP-607 back.jpg
RLP-607 A.jpg
RLP-607 B.jpg

   IRISH DRINKING SONGS is a somewhat artificial classification for the songs included in this album, in that it could be taken to mean that only songs of this sort would be sung at “drinking parties.”  Irish are given to such “drinking parties,” and secondly, that there is a certain narrowness in the choice of songs at get-togethers.  I fact the characteristic Irish get-together is what we call a hooley, which is a social evening including dancing as well as singing, and food as well as drinking, and at which the songs always include a good many of the national (or “rebel”) songs and ballads, a toast to Irish revels being an invariable part of the evening.  Thus the songs given here could e considered characteristic only if liberally interspersed with songs of the revel type.  This is not to say that the Irish hooley is a solemn or sanctimonious affair; not only are the songs of the type given here mainly rollicking and rumbustious, but many of the revel songs are spirited and cheerful, as well. 

   These songs have been selected so as to give an impression of varying types of songs whose merit is their entertainment value.  The audiences normally know the words well and always join is the chorus or even in the whole song.  

   As will be seen from the notes, some of the songs are no longer widely current in Ireland, but are included for historical and exile interest. 

Some of the songs are, of course, clearly Anglo-Irish, in the sense that they are the product of outsiders, or part-outsiders, endeavoring to express an Irish atmosphere, and with great sympathy and affection.  It may be doubted whether such characters as Tim Finnegan and Jeremy Lannigan ever existed or could exist in reality any more than did Handy Andy (a good-natured, blundering Irish lad in Samuel Lover’s novely by that name), but they represent on the one hand an Irish striving, and on the other an Anglo-Irish sympathy, for the right to enjoy oneself in one’s own way.  This was inadequate to the greater national strivings of Ireland, and the heyday of Anglo-Irishism is long past, but it has its historical place. 

   It is hoped that listeners will themselves join in the songs and get the most out of this record by imagining themselves for a while at a hooley in an Irish country kitchen, or at a gathering of Irish exiles settling down to a good old Irish evening.  So, clear the floor, boys, shake yer trotters and mind the dresser!  The whiskey is coming up! 

 

1. A SUP OF GOOD WHISKEY: The air to which this delightful tongue-tripper is sung is that of the popular jug tune.  The Irish Washerwoman. Clearly a   composed song, but of unknown authorship, it dates from the mid-nineteenth century. The song is self-explanatory and extols the virtues of the subject of

  its title. 

2. MUSH MUSH: This nineteenth century song to a traditional air is one of the most popular of all hooey songs both in and out of Ireland.  It is a quaint   mixture of Irish codology and Handy Andyism, with a dash of hedge-schoolmaster classicism, rounded off with the rather English tooralooral jingle. 

3. LANIGAN’S BALL: Like Finnegan’s Wake (see No. 9), this is a classic of the Dublin free-and-easies.  Its popularity in Ireland disappeared with this   century and the national revival, but it is still heard in hooley outside Ireland. 

4. A TOAST TO IRELAND: Here is a typical example of the get-together song based on the come-all-ye style.  A twentieth century anonymous ballad in the   continuing tradition of the exile songs, it is of generalized rather than of narrative patterp.  It is often heard sung by Irish workers at parties and hooleys   outside Ireland. 

5. THE RAKES OF MALLOW: One of the most famous of all Irish airs, the tune of this song is far better known than the words to it.  Though sometimes   attributed to the seventeenth century, its whole style and tone is that of the early eighteenth century.  It might indeed stand as a monument to the mad-cap   Anglo-Irish devil-may-care lordings of the day, when Mallow was the Irish equivalent of Bath in England at a later date.  Though the words are   undeservedly neglected and scarecely known except to the literati, the air is invariably beard at every hooley in Ireland and elsewhere.  Printed versions

  do not usually include the chorus. 

6. THE CRUISKEEN LAWN: Perhaps the most famous of all Irish drinking songs, The Cruiskeen Lawn (the full little flask) is well known and popular with   all Irish classes and is also a showpiece in favor with platform singers.  Its literary tone does not prevent it, however, from being a prime favorite in the   public houses, no doubt owing to its enchanting air.  It is usually attributed to the late seventeenth or early eighteen century. 

7. GARRYOWEN: This song commemorates a devil-may-care defiance of a less aristocratic and more rowdy kind than that of The Rakes of Maroow, who   were indisputably gentlemen.  Garryowen (Owen’s Garden) is a suburb of Limerick, which after the surrender and broken Treaty of 1691 became a major   garrison town of the British authorities.  Throughout the eighteenth century, up to about 1780, it was notorious for every kind of rag, riot and general   melee, not of political kinds but of the type common among soldiery and popoulace in conditions of occupation, when no serieus organized resistance has   yet developed.  Often it consisted of brass bands made up of frying pans and fire-irons, of hunting the fox through private houses at dead of night, or of   gangs running around naked pretending to be ghosts, and other like amusements.  Johnny Connell and Darby O’Brien, mentioned in the last two stanzas,   were famous squireens whose exploits were notorious around 1770-1780. 

8. MICK McGILLIGAN’S DAUGHTER: Here is an example of a parody driving out the original on which it is based.  The original, a rustic love song of the   same title, is now half-forgotten.  There are dozens of versions of the parody, in which Mary Anne becomes a legendary figure of heroic proportions.  The   version given here affords only a glimpse of Mary Anne’s potentialities.  Various versions of the song are extremely popular at Irish hooleys. 

9. FINNEGAN’S WAKE: This popular air is an Irish jig-tune, clearly intended for dancing, as the chorus shows.  The song itself is of mid-Victorian music   hall origin, belonging to the Dublin free-and-easies.  This type of song was objected to – as being overmuch in the Handy Andy tradition – by the Gaelic   League movement in its work to heighten national pride, and these songs have now long become more literary curiosities than popular ballads. This and Lanigan’s Ball are included here as the classic examples of this outmoded, rollicking style.  Finnegan’s Wake is also, of course, of interest for having provided James Joyce with the title of his famous book.  Joyce took the not-so-dead Finnegan as symbolic of Ireland herself, which gives the song a literary and historical interest which has nothing to do with its actual words.  The use of such a song with this symbolic purpose was clearly satirical on Joyce’s part. 

10. THE REAL OLD MOUNTAIN DEW: This song may be sung to this melody or to the air of Are You There, Moriarity.  Other versions of the song make mention of “guagers” (excise men) instead of “peelers,” making this song of early nineteenth century origin; “peelers” is the mid-nineteenth century term for policemen, named after Sir Robert Peel.  The “mountain dew” or poteen (pronounced potcheen) is spirits illicitly distilled from potatoes, or from wheat or rye if available.  This song-should not be confused with Good Old Mountain Dew, a song with like sentiments written by the North Carolina collector and folk singer, Bascom Lamar Lunsford. 

11. ONE-EYED REILLY: This song should need no introduction whatever to anyone who has ever been in the armed forces, being the modern barrack-room ballad par excellence.  It is, of course, by no means confined to the Irish, who have claim to it solely through the name Reilly. This is naturally a moderated

  version.  It is almost impossible to be at any sort of drinking party without hearing some version of this masculine classic, and the wilder the party, the   earthier the words. 

12. BARRY OF MACROOM: this early nineteenth century song of an unusual drinking feat is sung to the air of The Bantry Girl’s Lament; its words are a 

  ttributed to Richard Ryan.  Though Barry of Macroom and Jem Nash appear to be purely legendary, several Irish drinkers of note have left their mark.    Dan MacCarty, for example, was famous for drinking large quantities of rum and brandy, calling them (as distinct from punch) “naked truth.”  MacCarty   (mentioned in the first line of this song) died in 1751 at the age of 112.  Another character is on record as having declared under oath that he had been for   eighteen years in the habit of drinking at least twenty-four tumblers of whiskey punch every night.  “I never keep count beyond the two dozen,” said he.    In writing of this song, T. C. Croker in his Popular Song of Ireland remarks “it is hoped that Mr. Barry’s example may have had its influence in diffusing    a civilized taste for whiskey-punch … and thus, by inducing the drinkers of ‘naked truth’ to dilute their liquor, effect a moral improvement.” 

13. THE MOONSHINER: Both the tune and words of this song are widely known, the words appearing throughout the English-speaking world in numberless   variants.  The American Rye Whiskey, for example, is well known in Britain and Ireland.  The use of the term Moonshine for illicit liquor makes it not   earlier than the 18th century; this particular version is a twentieth century one, popularized by Delia Murphy. 

14. FLOWING BUMPERS: Sung to the tune of Lillibullero, this hymn to illicitly distilled whiskey appeared in Blackwood’s Magazine, December, 1821,   allegedly having been composed on the spur of the moment at four o’clock one morning.  It is a spirited example of the conventional “we won’t go home   till morning” mood, and is plainly meant for singing in chorus by men who are mellow rather than roaring drunk. 

15. MASTER McGRATH: This tune is probably the commonest of all ballad airs in the world, being that of The Old Orange Flute, Nottingham Fair, Villikens   and his Dinah, Sweet Betsy from Pike, etc.  This is a characteristic street ballad of an actual event, commemorating the winning of the Waterloo Cup by   the Irish greyhound, Master McGrath, one of the few dogs in the world to have a public monument erected in his honor.  The dog was bred in Dungarvin,   the ancient seat of the McGrath clans, trained by the sorting peer, Lord Lurgan, and won the Waterloo cup three times – 1868, 1869, 1871. There are a   number of variants of the song, which grows by accretion.  Though not in itself a “drinking song,” no hooley is complete without it. 

16. THE PARTING GLASS: The melody of this song is that of Sweet Coothill Town, a Munster song (see Joyce’s Irish peasant Songs, 1906), and Robert   Burns’ Adieu, A Heart-Warm Adieu (known as Burns’ Farewell). The words are late eighteenth or early nineteenth century, and have a definitely Burnsian   flavor. The song is particularly popular in the south-western counties of Ireland.  Variousother words have been put to this remarkably beautiful air at   different times. 

Notes by PATRICK GALVIN

 

A Biographical Note: - 

Born in Cork City, Ireland, in 1927, PATRICK GALVIN includes among his many talents those of story-writer, poet, critic, folksinger, song collector, and author.  His work has appeared in many of the leading British and Irish magazines and has been broadcast on Radio Eireann.  He has broadcast his own work on the British Broadcast in Corporation’s “Third Programme,” and has sung on the B.B.C folk song series.  “As I Roved Out.”  He is the author of “Irish Songs of Resistance.” Published in this country by The Folklore Press, 509 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 

 

 

NOTE: RLP12-604 edited by Kenneth S. Goldstein and notes written by Patrick Galvin. Instrumental arrangements by 

William Sahnow. Cover by Paul Bacon. 

RIVERSIDE RECORDS are released by BILL GRAUER PRODUCTIONS

553 West 51st Street New York 19, New York

RLP 12--608 IRISH LOVE SONGS Sung by PATRICK GALVIN Accompanied by ALJEFERY   

 

Patrick Galvin (vcl) acc by Al Jeffery Unknown place and date 

SIDE 1

  1. I Know Where I’m Going 

  2. My Love Came t Dublin 

  3. Canada Iho

  4. Brian Og and Molly Ban 

  5. The Bonny Boy

  6. The Banks of the Roses

  7. The Wind That Shakes the Barley

  8. Shule Aroon 

SIDE 2

  1. I Know My Love

  2. ‘Tis Pretty to Be in Ballinderry

  3. The Maid of the Sweet Brown Knowe

  4. The Green Bushes

  5. The lark in the Clear Air 

  6. The Jackets of Green 

  7. The Royal Blackbird 

RLP-608 front.jpg
RLP-608 back.jpg
RLP-608 A.jpg
RLP-608 B.jpg

NOTE: Edited by Kenneth S. Goldstein and notes written by Patrick Galvin. Cover by George Boornazian.

Instrumental Arrangements by Will Sahnow. Cover by George Boornazian. 

RIVERSIDE RECORDS are released by BILL GRAUER PRODUTIONS

553 West 51st Street New York 19, N.Y. 

RLP 12-609 EWAN MacCOLL: SCOTS FOLK SONGS 

Side 1 

  1. 1. The Barnyards o’ Delgaty 

  2. 2. Roy’s Wife of Aldivalloch 

  3. 3. The Reel o’ Stumpie 

  4. 4. Davie Faa 

  5. 5. Tail Toddle 

  6. 6. Charlie, O Charlie 

  7. 7. Nicky Tams 

  8. 8. The Wee, Wee German Lairdie 

  9. 9. Friendless Mary 

Side 2 

  1. 1. Johnnie Lad 

  2. 2. Kissin’s No Sin 

  3. 3. Maggie Lauder 

  4. 4. The Highland Muster Roll 

  5. 5. The Wars o’ Germany 

  6. 6. Johnnie Cope 

  7. 7. Lassie wi’ the Yellow Coatie 

  8. 8. The Bonnie Lass o’ Fyvie 

RLP-609 FRONT.jpg
RLP-609 BACK.jpg
RLP-609 A.jpg
RLP-609 B.jpg

NOTE: RLP12-609 edited by Kenneth S. Goldstein and notes written by Ewan MacColl. Cover by “Darth.” 

RLP12-609 reissued as Washington WLP-733 “Scits Folk songs” cover designed by Ken Deardoff. 

RIVERSIDE RECORDS are released by BILL GRAUER PRODUCITONS 

553 West 51st Street New York 19, N.Y.

 

RLP 12-610 BANJO SONGS OF THE SOUTHERN MOUNTAINS

 

Obray Ramsey (bj, vcl) Henry Gentry (g) (Side 1, #1; Side 2 #1 and 6) (1)

George Pegram (bj, vcl) Walter Parham (hca) (Side 1, #2, 4 and 6; Side 2, #4 and 8. Side 2, #2: banjo solo by Pegram (2) 

Harry West (bj)  Jeanie West (g, vcl) (Side1, #3; Side 2, #3, 5 and 7. Side 1, #5and 8:  (3) same instrumentation, with Vocal duets by the Wests.) 

“Aunt” Samantha Bumgarner ‘bj, vcl) (Side 1 #7; Side 2, #9) (4) 

Asheville, N. C., and New York City; date unknown 

 

Little Maggie (1)

Cripple Greek (2) 

Keep My Skillet Good and Greasy (3) 

Old Reuben (2) 

Careless Love (3) 

John Henry (2) 

Way Down on the Island (4) 

Awake, Awake Ye Drowsy Sleepers (3) 

Poor Little Ellen (1) 

Arkansas Traveller (2) 

The Boston Burglar (3)

Good Old Mountain Dew (2)

Lost John (3) 

Pretty Polly (1) 

Finger Ring (3) 

Cumberland Gap (2) 

Fly Around, My Pretty Little Miss (4) 

 

NOTE: RLP12-610 edited and notes written by Kenneth S. Goldstein. Recorded by Kenneth S. Goldstein and William A. Grant. Cover design by “Darth” and

photographed by Charles Preissler

RLP12-610 reissued as Washington WLP-712 “Good Old Mountain Dew” cover designed by Ken Deardoff. 

RIVERSIDE RECORDS are released by BILL GRAUER PRODUCTIONS 

418 West 49th Street New York 19, N.Y

RLP-610 front.jpg
RLP-610 back.jpg
RLP-610A.jpg
RLP-610B.jpg

RLP 12-611 AMERICAN STREET SOGNS: PINK ANDERSON – GARY DAVIS

 

PINK ANDERSON: Carolina Street Ballads 

Pink Anderson (vcl, g)  Jumbo Lewis (wbd -1)

Charlottesville, Virginia; May 29, 1950

 

John Henry (5:25) 

Every Day in the Week (1) (3:31)     

The Ship Titanic (3:14)

Greasy Greens (2:56) 

Wreck of the Old 97 (3:26) 

I've Got Mine (3:05) 

He's in the Jailhouse Now (3:42) 

 

NOTE: all 7 titles also on OBC-524 & OBCCD-524-2

RLP2-148 “Gospel, Blues and Street Songs”

RLP12-611 edited by Kenneth S. Goldstein and notes written by K. S. Goldstein and Daniel G. Hoffman. 

and recorded by Paul Clayton. Cover by Gene Gogerty.

Editing and notes (RLP12-148) by Kenneth S. Goldstein; recording Engineer: Paul Clayton 

and re-mastered by Jack Matthews, 1961]

GARY DAVIS: Street Spirituals Harlem S 

Rev. (Reverend) Gary Davis (vcl, g) NYC; January 29, 1956

 

Blow Gabriel (2:14)   

Twelve Gates to the City (3:22) 

Samson and Delilah (3:52) 

Oh, Lord, Search My Heart (3:02) 

Get Right Church (3:04) 

You Got to Go Down (2:40) 

Keep Your Lamps Trimmed and Burning (2:35)

There Was a Time I Was Blind (2:36) 

NOTE: all 8 titles also on OBC-524 & OBCCD-524-2

RLP12-611 edited by Kenneth S. Goldstein and notes written by K. S. Goldstein and Daniel G. Hoffman. 

and recorded by Kenneth S. Goldstein. Cover by Gene gogerty. 

RLP12-148 “Gospel, Blues and Street Songs” edited and recorded by Kenneth S. Goldstein; 

RLP12-611 remastered by Jack Matthews, 1961.

S-2 “Riverside Folk Song Sampler”

 

RIVERSIDE RECORDS are released by BILL GRAUER PRODUCTIONS, Inc.

418 West 49th Street New York 19, New York

RLP-611 front.jpg
RLP-611 back.jpg
RLP-611 A.jpg
RLP-611 B.jpg

RLP 12-612 SCOTS STREET SONGS Sung by EWAN MacCOLL 

with occasional concertina accompaniment by ALF EDWARDS

 

Ewan MacColl (vcl) acc by Alf Edwards (concertina)

Place and date unknown (c. 1956) 

 

To the Begging I Will Go (2:35) 

The Brewer’s Daughter (2:40) 

Fitba’ Crazy (1:12) 

The Lion’s Den (4:53) 

Jamie Raeburn’s Farewell (3:52)  

The Butcher Boy (3:54) 

The Bonnie Bunch of Roses (5:26) 

The Banks of Sweet Dundee (2:46) 

Miss Brown (2:12) 

Cock o’ the Midden (0:17) 

My Last Farewell to Stirring (3:19) 

The Sheffield Apprentice (5:54)  

Come All Ye Tramps and Hawkers (2:12)  

MacPherson’s Lament (5:07) 

Van Diemen’s Land (2:52) 

NOTE: RLP12-612 edited by Kenneth S. Goldstein, notes written by K. S. Goldstein and Ewan MacColl. Cover by Gene Gogerty. 

S-2 “Riverside Folk Song Sampler”, WLP-738 “Street Songs of Scotland” cover designed by Ken Deardoff. 

RIVERSIDE RECORDS are released by BILL GRAUER PRODUCTIONS 

418 West 49th Street New York 19, N.Y. 

RLP-612 front.jpg
RLP-612 back.jpg
RLP-612 A.jpg
RLP-612 B.jpg
S2.jpg

S-2

RLP 12-613 PATRICK GALVIN: IRISH STREET SONGS 

Patrick Galvin (vcl)  acc by Al Jeffery (g, bj)  place and date; unknown 

Side 1 

 1. Courting in the Kitchen 

 2. The Lowlands of Holland 

 3. The Limerick Rake 

 4. The Dublin Murder Ballad 

 5. Donnelly and Cooper 

 6. The Old Orange Flute 

 7. Van Diemen’s Land 

Side 2 

 1. Whiskey in the Jar 

 2. The Rocks of Baun 

 3. The Hackler from Grouse Hall 

 4. Boston City 

 5. The Enniskillen Dragoon 

 6. Johnny I Hardly Kew Ye 

 7. Young Molly Ban 

RLP-613 front.jpg
RLP-613 back.jpg
RLP-613 A.jpg
RLP-613 B.jpg

NOTE: RLP12-613 edited by Kenneth S. Goldstein and notes written by Pat Galvin and K. S. Goldstein. 

Instrumental arrangements by Will Sahnow. Cover Gene Gogerty. 

 

RLP 12-614 ENGLISH STREET SONGS: Sung by A. L. Lloyd

– Accompanied by Alf Edwards

 

A. L. Lloyd (vcl)  acc by Alf Edwards (concertina) 

Place and date; unknown (1956?) 

SIDE 1

 1. The Indian Lass RLP12-614 

 2. The Oxford Tragedy 

 3. The Girl With the Box On Her Head 

 4. The Unfortunate Rake 

 5. The Bonny Bunch of Roses 

 6. The Death of Bill Brown 

SIDE 2

 1. Jackie Munro -

 2. The Bloody Gardener -

 3. The Cockfight -

 4. The Grand Conversation on Napoleon -

 5. The Dark-Eyed Sailor -

 6. Died for Love

RLP-614 front.jpg
RLP-614 back.jpg
RLP-614 A.jpg
RLP-614 B.jpg

NOTE: all 12 titles also on Washington WLP-737

RLP12-614 edited by Kenneth S. Goldstein and notes written by A. L. Lloyd. Cover by Gene Gogerty. 

WLP-737 “Street Songs of England”

           

RIVERSIDE RECORDS are released by BILL GRAUER PRODUCTIONS, Inc.

418 West 49th Street New York 19, New York

R LP 12-615 BLOODY BALLADS Sung by PAUL CLAYTON

Classic British and American Murder Ballads

 

place unknown; May 1956 

Paul Clayton (vcl, g)

Pearl Bryan (2:23)

The Bankc of the Ohio (3:23) 

Stackolee (1:36) 

The Two brothers (3:09) 

The Brookfield Murder (1:44) 

Rose Connoley (1:38) 

Jellon Grame (5:17) 

Omie Wise (3:10) 

The Suncook Town Tragedy (2:09) 

Poor EllenSmith (1:59) 

The Miller’s Boy (3:03) 

Delia (2:16) 

Pretty Polly (3:06) 

The Cruel Mother (4:24) 

John Hollin (2:09) 

TomDula (3:47) 

Edward (2:18) 

Lula Viers (1:50) 

NOTE: RLP12-615 edited and notes written by Kenneth S. Goldstein and Paul Clayton. Cover by Gene Gogerty. 

WLP-727 “Paul Clayton: British and American Murder Ballads” designed by Ken Deardoff. 

S-2 “Riverside Folk Song Sampler” Produced and recorded by Kenneth S. Goldstein

RIVERSIDE RECORDS are produced by BILL GRAUER PRODUCTIONS, Inc.

235 West 46th Street New York 36, New York

RLP-615 front.jpg
RLP-615 back.jpg
RLP-615 A.jpg
RLP-615 B.jpg
S-2.jpg

S-2


RLP 12-616 IRISH HUMOR SONGS Sung by PATRICK GALVIN 

 

Accompanied by AL JEFFERY, banjo (on Side 1, #1 and 4; Side 2, #2, 4 and 7) and

guitar (on all other selections; except side 1, #5 which is unaccompanied) instrumental arrangements by Will Sahnow.

Patrick Galvin(vcl) acc by Al Jeffery (bj, g)  instrumental arrangements by Will Sahnow. 

Place and date unknown (1956?) 

 

Lanty Leary (1:11) 

The Irish Rover (2:47) 

Brian O’Linn (3:29) 

Bold  Thady Quill (3:42)  

The Galbally Farer (2:54) 

The Peeler and the Goat (3:31) 

Square-Toed Boots (2:16) 

Song of the Taxes (2:59)  

Haste to the Wedding (1:45) 

The Mountjoy Hotel (3:38) 

Football Crazy (2:25) - S-2

King Billy (3:33) 

The Humor Is On Me Now (2:58)  

The Cork Leg (2:18) 

NOTE: RLP12-616 edited by Kenneth S. Goldstein and notes written by Patrick Galvin.  recording Engineer: no information. 

Cover designed by Paul Bacon – Ken Brarren – Harris Lewine. 

S-2 “Riverside Folk Song Sampler”

RIVERSIDE RECORDS are released by BILL GRAUER PRODUCITONS 

418 West 49th Street New York 19, New York

S-2.jpg
RLP-616 front.jpg
RLP-616 back.jpg
RLP-616 A.jpg
RLP-616 B.jpg

S-2

RLP 12-617 SOUTHERN MOUNTAIN: FOLKSONGS AND BALLADS 

 

Artus Moser (vcl, g, dulcimer); (1)  Harry West (vcl, g, mand) and  Jeanie West (vcl, g); (2)  George Pegram (vcl, bj) and  Walter Parham (vcl, hca); (3)   Virgil Sturgil (vcl, dulcimer) (4)  Obray Ramsey (vcl, bj) (5) 

Recorded in Ashville; Swannanoa, North Cal., and NYC 

Side 1 

 1. Bonny Blue Eyes (1)

 2. Nine Pound Hammer (2) 

 3. The Boston Burglar (3) 

 4. Mountain for Chase (3) 

 5. Banks of the Ohio (2) 

 6. Devilish Mary (4) 

 7. Jim Gunter and the Steer (5) 

 8. The Sailor on the Deep Blue Sea (1) 

 9. Bury Me Beneath the Willow (2) 

Side 2 

 1. I Went Up on the Mountain (1) 

 2. Knoxville Girl (2) 

 3. I Am A Pilgrim (3) 

 4. Charles Guiteau (4) 

 5. Mole in the Ground 

 6. Wild Bill Jones (2) 

 7. Pickin’ and Blowin’ (3) 

 8. The Cherry Tree Carol (1) 

 9. On Top of Old Smoky (5) 

RLP-617 front.jpg
RLP-617 back.jpg
RLP-617 A.jpg
RLP-617 B.jpg

NOTE: RLP12-617 edited and notes written by Kenneth S. Goldstein. Recorded by K. S. Goldstein and William A. Grant. 

Cover by Gene Gogerty. 

RLP12-617 reissued as Washington WLP-707 “Blue Ridge Banjo: Southern Mountain Folk Songs” 

           

RIVERSIDE RECORDS are produced by BILL GRAUER Inc. 

235 West 46th Street New York 36, New York 

RLP 12-618 ENGLISH DRINKING SONGS Sung by A. L. LLOYD

 

A. L. Lloyd (vcl)  acc by Alf Edwards (concertina-1)  Al Jeffery (bj-2, hca-3) 

c. mid 1956

 

The Darby Ram (2) (3:18) 

The Foggy Dew (1) (3:19) 

Maggie May (2) (1:59) 

When Johnson’s Ale Was New (3) (2:17) 

The Butcher and the Chambermaid (2) (2:02) 

A Jug of Punch (3:00) 

The Parson and the Maid (2) (1:37) 

Three Drunken Huntsmen (2) (2:00) 

All for Me Grog (1) (2:07) 

The Drunken Maidens (2) (1:42) 

Rosin the Beau (1) (4:38) 

The Farmer’s Servant (2) (2:18) 

John Barleycorn (1) (2:44) 

A Jug of This (2) (2:03) 

 

NOTE: RLP12-618 edited by Kenneth S. Goldstein; recording Engineer: no information

S-2 “Riverside Folk Song Sampler” edited by Kenneth S. Goldstein; recording Engineer: no information

RIVERSIDE RECORDS are released by BILL GRAUER PRODUCITONS 

418 West 49th Street New York 19, New York

S-2.jpg

S-2

RLP-618 front.jpg
RLP-618 back.jpg
RLP-618 A.jpg
RLP-618 B.jpg

RLP 12-619 JOHN GREENWAY: THE GREAT AMERICAN BUM,

HOBO AND MUGRATORY WORKERS SONGS 

John Greenway (vcl,g)

New York(?); December 1955 

Side 1

 1. The Great American Bum 

 2. Portland County Jail 

 3. All Around the Water Tank 

 4. The Wabash Cannonball 

 5. Ramlin’ 

 6. The Mild Mannered Man 

 7. Hobo Bill’s Last Ride 

 8. Bonneville Dam 

 9. Going Down the Road 

  10. Mysteries of a Hobo’s Life 

Side 2

 1. The Big Rock Candy Mountain 

 2. Hard Travelin’ 

 3. Dying Hobo 

 4. Jay Gould’s Daughter 

 5. The Lehigh Valley 

 6. Tramp, Tramp, Tram 

 7. Acres of Clams 

 8. Hallellujah, I’m a Bum 

 9. The Hobo’s Lullaby 

RLP-619 front.jpg
RLP-619 back.jpg
RLP-619 A.jpg
RLP-619 B.jpg

NOTE: RLP12-619 edited and notes written by Kenneth S. Goldstein. Cover by Gene Gogerty. 

RLP12-619 reissued as Washington WLP-710. “The Big Rock Candy Mountain” 

RIVERSIDE RECORDS are released by BILL GRAUER PRODUCTIONS 

418 West 49th Street New York 19, N.Y. 

 


RRLP 12-620 JEAN RITCHIE: SATURDAY NIGHT AND SUNDAY TOO 
 

 

ean Ritchie (vcl, g, dulcimer)  Roger Sprung (vln, bj)  

New York; May 1956 

Side 1 Saturday Night; 

 1. Betty Larkin 

 2. Two Dukes A-Rovin’ 

 3. Baby-O 

 4. Green Grows the Willow Tree 

 5. Susan Girl 

 6. Dear Companion 

 7. Huntin’ the Buck 

 8. Lady Margaret 

 9. Charlie 

  10. Hop Up My ladies 

Side 2 Sunday 

 1. Been a Long Time A-Travelling 

 2. The Day Is Past and Gone 

 3. Father Get Ready 

 4. Guide Me, O ‘Thou Great Jehovah 

 5. I’ve Got a Man 

 6. Sing to Me of Heaven 

 7. Hiram Hubbard 

 8. God Bless Them Moonshiners 

 9. Shady Grove 

  10. Lullaby Medley 

RLP-620 front.jpg
RLP-620 back.jpg
RLP-620 A.jpg
RLP-620 B.jpg

NOTE: RLP12-620 recorded and edited Kenneth S. Goldstein. Notes written by Jean Ritchie.

Cover photo by George Pickow and typography by Gene Gogerty. 

RIVERSIDE RECORDS are released by BILL GRAUER PRODUCITONS 

418 West 49th Street New York 19, N. Y.